This is a Call to Action for a
Non-Hierarchical Occupation of Monsanto Everywhere

Whether you like it or not, chances are Monsanto contaminated the food you ate today with chemicals and unlabeled GMOs. Monsanto controls much of the world's food supply at the expense of food democracy worldwide. This site is dedicated to empowering citizens of the world to take action against Monsanto & it's enablers like the FDA, USDA, EPA, GMA, BIO, and the processed food companies that use Monsanto's products.




Breaking the Set: Taking Monsanto to Court – Interview with Bill Freese

Posted: February 20th, 2013 | Filed under: Press, Video | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

Abby Martin talks to Bill Freese, science policy analyst at the Center for Food Safety, about the Supreme Court case between Monsanto and one Indiana farmer, and the implications this could have on international agro-business.


Source: Youtube

[Russia Today] Behind the scenes: Undercover shareholder pushes for transparency at Monsanto

Posted: February 1st, 2013 | Filed under: Incident Reports, Press, Video | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |


Behind the scenes: Undercover shareholder pushes for transparency at Monsanto

Published February 1st
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­About a dozen protesters calling themselves Occupy Monsanto spent several hours near Monsanto’s headquarters in Creve Coeur, Missouri as shareholders voted on members for the company’s Board of Directors.

The protesters called for more transparency in the multinational company’s operations especially in labeling, research and business practices.

Adam Eidinger who owns 75 Monsanto shares read his speech to the protesters before heading to the meeting to address shareholders with a statement on behalf of Pesticide Action Network, the company, which submitted the study on potential risks of using GMOs.

RT: You are a Monsanto shareholder, so you’re obviously interested in the company making a profit. But you are planning to speak on behalf of the company which submitted the study on the potential risks of Monsanto products. Why are you doing this?

AE: Well the resolution we had would have required a report to be written that could be shared with researchers and scientists across the globe about the risks that they know – the company knows already – about their genetically modified crops. Which many safe food activists believe make us more reliant on herbicides and chemicals that the company also sells. And these chemicals may be what’s causing higher rates of cancer in industrialized nations across the globe.

We know how it caused tumors in rats that were fed in long term studies last year. Dr. Seralini’s study was a topic during this shareholder meeting, I brought it up. I was able to speak during the meeting.

And this meeting was closed to the public, as you said. And one of the things we are asking for is in the future this to be live-streamed.  People around the world care about what’s going into the food. They may not want to own Monsanto stock.

I only bought the stock so I could speak at this shareholder meeting.

RT: A Chinese economist has criticized Monsanto for controlling the country’s soybean market and trying to do the same with corn and cotton in the country. How is this impacting local farmers?

AE: It devastates local farmers time and time again. We’ve seen countries where Monsanto has introduced ‘patented’ technologies, I like to call it. And they only provide hybrid seeds to farmers who then loose bio-diversity, loose varieties that have actually adapted to that area.

What we need on this planet is better distribution of food and we need better organic methods to be shared with farmers, not more reliance on chemicals and pesticides.

And now, it was quite alarming at this shareholder meeting, there are these new technologies where they are going to be modifying insects and viruses and introducing these novel viruses into the environment to handle pests, to kill pests.

We wonder why bee populations around the world are plummeting – it’s because of these chemicals and possibly because of this new technology.

RT: In 2009, Monsanto was accused by the US Justice Department of breaking anti-trust rules. But in 2012 the inquiry was closed without taking any enforcement action. Why?

AE: I think Monsanto is a perfect example of regulatory capture where an industry captures the levers of government, levers of our democracy that are supposed to protect us from companies that would profit over our health being impacted in a really negative way. I mean people may be allergic to these crops, to the chemicals that are used on them, and they are trying to avoid them. And in America they have no right to know if the food has been genetically modified or not. And that is something I brought up at the meeting, if you want to be transparent you ought to label the food. 

So yes, you have people at the FDA like Michael Taylor who is the head of food safety who also was the vice-president of Monsanto for a decade and prior to that worked at the FDA as well. So it’s a revolving door, he was at the FDA, went to work for Monsanto and now he’s back at the FDA. It’s clear that secretary of state Clinton, she emphasized giving these hybrid seeds to Africa, yet there’s no proof this is going to help African farmers. I think quite the contrary – they are going to become dependent on buying seeds from the United States when they should be able to save their seeds and develop their own varieties in Africa.


Source: Russia Today

KPLR: Protestors Want Monsanto To Be More Transparent

Posted: January 31st, 2013 | Filed under: Press, Video | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

(KPLR) – Protestors in front of Monsanto Thursday to pressure the company’s CEO to make shareholder meetings more transparent. The bio-tech firm located in Creve Coeur, voted on a shareholder proposal to launch a study on risks and impacts of its genetically modified organisms. The activists supported the study, but are pointing out Monsanto is not living up to its own goal of ensuring information is accessible to the public.


Source: KPLR

Creve Coeur Patch: Occupy Monsanto Protests Shareholder Meeting

Posted: January 31st, 2013 | Filed under: Photos, Press | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |
creve coeur patch occupy monsanto Creve Coeur Patch: Occupy Monsanto Protests Shareholder Meeting Washington Walmart Vermont Transparency Stream St. Louis Scientist Research Protest Press Pledge Pesticide Action Network Oregon Occupy Monsanto New Mexico Monsanto Missouri Maggie Rotermund Legislation Internet Hawaii Harrington Investments GMOs GMO Labeling gmo Demonstration Creve Coeur Patch Creve Coeur Connecticut Coca Cola Apple Annual Shareholder Meeting

Occupy Monsanto Protests Shareholder Meeting

Monsanto’s shareholders held their annual meeting at the corporate headquarters in Creve Coeur.
By Maggie Rotermund

Shareholders for Monsanto gathered on the campus of the Creve Coeur agri-giant’s world headquarters Thursday to elect members of the company’s Board of Directors.

Approximately eight demonstrators, calling themselves Occupy Monsanto, spent several hours Thursday afternoon holding signs and banners along Olive Boulevard. The group was protesting Monsanto’s use of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and its lack of transparency in research.

Adam Eidinger, speaking on behalf of Harrington Investments and the Pesticide Action Network, read a statement to protesters before heading inside to speak to other shareholders. Eidinger said he owns 75 shares of Monsanto stock.

Eidinger said he was going to speak to the shareholders about transparency in labeling, research and business practices.

His speech read, in part:

The way forward is by upholding the Company’s pledge to transparency. First, this means following the lead of other Fortune 500 companies like Apple, Coca-Cola and Walmart and begin to stream over the Internet audio and video of all future shareholder meetings. Second, the Company should cease its efforts to stymie legislative solutions that provided increased transparency around GMO foods. States like Washington, Hawaii, Connecticut, Oregon, New Mexico, Vermont and even here in Missouri have legislative solutions in the works. These efforts should be embraced by the Company, not fought off with lobbyists and lawyers. Third, the Company needs to provide scientists access to the Company’s seeds and existing body of research. Let independent scientist provide the much needed peer-reviewed studies, so the public at large believes this Company is being truly transparent.

Eidinger quoted Monsanto CEO Hugh Grant from an interview with the Wall Street Journal. Grant said “we (Monsanto) needs to do a much better job explaining where food comes from.” To view the full WSJ interview, click here.

See Patch’s previous coverage:


Source: Creve Coeur Patch

PressTV: Argentina activists rally against US Monsanto expansion in Latin America

Posted: January 31st, 2013 | Filed under: Press, Video | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |


Argentinians have said no to what they call Monsanto´s “deathly” business in Latin America.

In Buenos Aires, the action group “Millions against Monsanto” has led a protest at the House of Cordoba, a province located in the center of Argentina where the US multinational company is developing its biggest regional factory.

According to activists, the construction of the facility has been approved by provincial authorities but no official report on environmental damages has yet been conducted.

Political complicity, leaders of the protest said, is fostering the expansion of Monsanto´s “chain of profit and death”: Monsanto sells seeds that are resistant to its own glyphosate-based Roundup, a key herbicide used in Argentina´s “green gold” soybean industry.

In the meantime, thousands of farmers are exposed to serious health risks -cancer, birth defects, intestinal, heart and neuronal conditions- as a recent investigation by the University of Buenos Aires shows.

But Argentina is only one link of Monsanto´s billionaire expansion in Latin America.

In Paraguay, for instance, demonstrators denounced that the biotech company has managed to introduce its transgenic soy thanks to economic lobbies linked to the impeachment of President Fernando Lugo last year. They called it the “agribusiness coup”.

Monsanto has reported to have nearly tripled its profits in the first fiscal quarter of 2013 as its regional sales boom and governments allow the US-based firm to spread.

Meanwhile, on the margins of the anti-Monsanto demonstration, Argentine left-wing opposition lawmakers held a political meeting to condemn the corporate power of agribusiness and the increasing control of food sovereignty by transnational companies.


Source: Press TV Youtube Channel & Press TV website

St. Louis Business Journal: Food activists to protest at Monsanto shareholder meeting Jan. 31

Posted: January 30th, 2013 | Filed under: Events, Press | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |
01LowDoesntWant e1349112622672 St. Louis Business Journal: Food activists to protest at Monsanto shareholder meeting Jan. 31 Vote U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission St. Louis Business Journal St. Louis Shareholder Resolution SEC proxy Protest Occupy Monsanto Napa monsanto shareholder meeting Monsanto MO Missouri hugh grant Harrington Investments GMO Labeling gmo E.B. Solomont Demonstration Creve Coeur CEO Annual Shareholder Meeting Activist Activism

Monsanto World Headquarters, Sept 17 2012. Photo: Don Fitz

Food activists to protest at Monsanto shareholder meeting Jan. 31

Activists plan to protest outside Monsanto Co.’s shareholder meeting Thursday.

By E.B. Solomont, Reporter, St. Louis Business Journal

Food activists plan to protest outside Monsanto Co.’s shareholder meeting Thursday, calling on the $13.5 billion seed company to be more transparent.

The activists also hope to draw attention to a shareholder proposal to study “material financial risks or operational potential impacts” on Monsanto associated with seed contamination from genetically modified organisms, among other things.

“Monsanto pledges transparency, but provides very little,” says Adam Eidinger, an activist and Monsanto shareholder, who plans to speak at the meeting, which will take place at Monsanto’s Creve Coeur headquarters.

Reached by phone, Eidinger said he would speak on behalf of Harrington Investments of Napa, Calif., which submitted the shareholder proposal.

Eidinger said he personally holds 75 shares of Monsanto stock. “This is about the food people eat,” he said. “I am a shareholder; I’m also an activist who wants to see the company reform in a major way.”

The board of Monsanto, led by Chairman and CEO Hugh Grant, is against the proposal. “Disclosure of material financial risks or operational impacts on the company is required by SEC reporting requirements, and we take seriously our responsibility to identify, analyze and transparently report such risks or potential impacts,” company officials said in a Dec. 10 proxy document filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

In the filing, officials cited various programs — including a technology use guide, ongoing dialogue with seed users and academics, and ongoing discussions to determine best practices, among other things. “An additional report to restate such risks or impacts as suggested in the proposal would be redundant and provide no meaningful additional information to shareowners,” the proxy stated.


Source: St. Louis Business Journal


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