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During the Cold War 2,4-D was an Agent of Biological Warfare

Posted: December 9th, 2013 | Filed under: Research | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Currently, the USDA is reviewing GMO crops designed to withstand 2,4-D and Dicamba. However, 50 years ago 2,4-D, otherwise known as 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid, was considered a agent of biological warfare that could kill farmers crops. Agent Orange, used by the U.S. military as part of its herbicidal warfare program, Operation Ranch Hand, during the Vietnam War from 1961 to 1971, caused thousands of birth defects. Agent Orange is half 2,4-D and half 2,4,5-T, which means these GMO crops are very toxic to humans and the environment. Worse, if approved, these toxic GMOs wouldn’t be required to be labeled.


What The Farmer Should Know Biological Warfare Agent During the Cold War 2,4 D was an Agent of Biological Warfare Vietnam War Vietnam Toxic herbicides Handbook GMO Labeling gmo Civil Defense Chemicals Agent Orange 2 4 Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid 2 4 D 2 4 5 Trichlorophenoxyacetic Acid 2 4 5 T
“Before disaster strikes.. What the Farmer Should Know About Biological Warfare”
Federal Civil Defense Administration Handbook, 1955

24D Biological Warfare Agent During the Cold War 2,4 D was an Agent of Biological Warfare Vietnam War Vietnam Toxic herbicides Handbook GMO Labeling gmo Civil Defense Chemicals Agent Orange 2 4 Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid 2 4 D 2 4 5 Trichlorophenoxyacetic Acid 2 4 5 T

POSSIBLE METHODS OF ATTACK

The methods of attack which seem more likely are:
1. Destructive dusts from airplanes carrying chemical plant growth inhibitors, such as 2,4-D or 2,4,5-T.
2. Large scale aerial dissemination of disease-producing spores.
3. Secret introduction of foreign plant diseases or insects new to this country.