This is a Call to Action for a
Non-Hierarchical Occupation of Monsanto Everywhere

Whether you like it or not, chances are Monsanto contaminated the food you ate today with chemicals and unlabeled GMOs. Monsanto controls much of the world's food supply at the expense of food democracy worldwide. This site is dedicated to empowering citizens of the world to take action against Monsanto & it's enablers like the FDA, USDA, EPA, GMA, BIO, and the processed food companies that use Monsanto's products.




New York Times: Major Grocer to Label Foods With Gene-Modified Content

Posted: March 8th, 2013 | Filed under: Press | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

stop gmo food contamination New York Times: Major Grocer to Label Foods With Gene Modified Content World Health Organization Whole Foods Market Whole Foods Washington Wal Mart Voters twitter Soybeans Saffron Road Republicans Proposition 37 poll Pepsico OPLIY Non GMO Project Missouri Mellman Group Mark Kastel Louis Finkel legislatures Legislation Karen Batra just label it Grocery Manufacturers Association Grocery GMO Soybeans GMO Labeling GMO Corn genetically modified ingredients Gary Hirshberg Food and Drug Administration FDA facebook eat in Democrats Customers Cornucopia Institute Corn Coca Cola California bovine growth hormone biotech industry BIO American Medical Association American Halal Company A.C. Gallo

Safe Food Action St. Louis outside Whole Foods Market in Brentwood, MO

Major Grocer to Label Foods With Gene-Modified Content

By Stephanie Strom

Whole Foods Market, the grocery chain, on Friday became the first retailer in the United States to require labeling of all genetically modified foods sold in its stores, a move that some experts said could radically alter the food industry.
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A. C. Gallo, president of Whole Foods, said the new labeling requirement, to be in place within five years, came in response to consumer demand. “We’ve seen how our customers have responded to the products we do have labeled,” Mr. Gallo said. “Some of our manufacturers say they’ve seen a 15 percent increase in sales of products they have labeled.”

Genetically modified ingredients are deeply embedded in the global food supply, having proliferated since the 1990s. Most of the corn and soybeans grown in the United States, for example, have been genetically modified. The alterations make soybeans resistant to a herbicide used in weed control, and causes the corn to produce its own insecticide. Efforts are under way to produce a genetically altered apple that will spoil less quickly, as well as genetically altered salmon that will grow faster. The announcement ricocheted around the food industry and excited proponents of labeling. “Fantastic,” said Mark Kastel, co-director of the Cornucopia Institute, an organic advocacy group that favors labeling.

The Grocery Manufacturers Association, the trade group that represents major food companies and retailers, issued a statement opposing the move. “These labels could mislead consumers into believing that these food products are somehow different or present a special risk or a potential risk,” Louis Finkel, the organization’s executive director of government affairs, said in the statement.

Mr. Finkel noted that the Food and Drug Administration, as well as regulatory and scientific bodies including the World Health Organization and the American Medical Association, had deemed genetically modified products safe.

The labeling requirements announced by Whole Foods will include its 339 stores in the United States and Canada. Since labeling is already required in the European Union, products in its seven stores in Britain are already marked if they contain genetically modified ingredients. The labels currently used show that a product has been verified as free of genetically engineered ingredients by the Non GMO Project, a nonprofit certification organization. The labels Whole Foods will use in 2018, which have yet to be created, will identify foods that contain such ingredients.

The shift by Whole Foods is the latest in a series of events that has intensified the debate over genetically modified foods. Voters defeated a hard-fought ballot initiative in California late last year after the biotech industry, and major corporations like PepsiCo and Coca-Cola, spent millions of dollars to fight the effort. Other initiatives have qualified for the ballot in Washington State and Missouri, while consumers across the country have been waging a sort of guerrilla movement in supermarkets, pasting warning stickers on products suspected of having G.M.O. ingredients from food companies that oppose labeling. Proponents of labeling insist that consumers have a right to know about the ingredients in the food they eat, and they contend that some studies in rats show that bioengineered food can be harmful.

Gary Hirshberg, chairman of Just Label It, a campaign for a federal requirement to label foods containing genetically modified ingredients, called the Whole Foods decision a “game changer.”

“We’ve had some pretty big developments in labeling this year,” Mr. Hirshberg said, adding that 22 states now have some sort of pending labeling legislation. “Now, one of the fastest-growing, most successful retailers in the country is throwing down the gantlet.”

He compared the potential impact of the Whole Foods announcement to Wal-Mart’s decision several years ago to stop selling milk from cows treated with growth hormone. Today, only a small number of milk cows are injected with the hormone.

Karen Batra, a spokeswoman for BIO, a trade group representing the biotech industry, said it was too early to determine what impact, if any, the Whole Foods decision would have. “It looks like they want to expand their inventory of certified organic and non-G.M.O. lines,” Ms. Batra said. “The industry has always supported the voluntary labeling of food for marketing reasons.”

She contended, however, that without scientific evidence showing that genetically modified foods caused health or safety issues, labeling was unnecessary.

Nonetheless, companies have shown a growing willingness to consider labeling. Some 20 major food companies, as well as Wal-Mart, met recently in Washington to discuss genetically modified labeling.

Coincidentally, the American Halal Company, a food company whose Saffron Road products are sold in Whole Foods stores, on Friday introduced the first frozen food, a chickpea and spinach entree, that has been certified not to contain genetically modified ingredients.

More than 90 percent of respondents to a poll of potential voters in the 2012 elections, conducted by the Mellman Group in February last year, were in favor of labeling genetically modified foods. Some 93 percent of Democrats and 89 percent of Republicans in the poll, which had a margin of error of plus or minus 3.1 percent, favored it.

But in the fight over the California initiative, Proposition 37, the opponents succeeded in persuading voters that labeling would have a negative effect on food prices and the livelihood of farmers.

That fight, however, has cost food companies in other ways. State legislatures and regulatory agencies are pondering labeling on their own, and consumers have been aggressive in criticizing some of the companies that fought the initiative, using Twitter and Facebook to make their views known.

Buoyed by what they see as some momentum in the labeling war, consumers, organic farmers and food activists plan to hold an “eat-in” outside the F.D.A.’s offices next month to protest government policies on genetically modified crops and foods. Whole Foods, which specializes in organic products, tends to be favored by those types of consumers, and it enjoys strong sales of its private-label products, whose composition it controls. The company thus risks less than some more traditional food retailers in taking a stance on labeling.

In 2009, Whole Foods began submitting products in its 365 Everyday Value private-label line to verification by the Non GMO Project.

But even Whole Foods has not been immune to criticism on the G.M.O. front. A report by Cornucopia, “Cereal Crimes,” revealed that its 365 Corn Flakes line contained genetically modified corn. By the time the report came out in October 2011, the product had been reformulated and certified as organic.

Today, Whole Foods’ shelves carry some 3,300 private-label and branded products that are certified, the largest selection of any grocery chain in the country.

Mr. Gallo said Whole Foods did not consult with its suppliers about its decision and informed them of it only shortly before making its announcement Friday. He said Whole Foods looked forward to working with suppliers on the labeling.


Source: New York Times

The Nation: Mitt Romney, Monsanto Man

Posted: September 12th, 2012 | Filed under: Press | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |
romney monsanto man Charles Dharapak The Nation: Mitt Romney, Monsanto Man Wheat Western Growers Association Wayne Barrett Walmart USDA United Nations United Fresh Produce Association Union of Concerned Scientists Tom Vilsack Tom Nassif Steve Troxler Starbucks soybean Solutia Solamere Capital Shawn McCoy Roy Blunt Roundup Ready RoundUp Richard Mahoney rice Randy Russell Ralph Willard PCBs Patrick Graham Osborn & Barr NutraSweet National Pork Producers Council National Council of Farmer Cooperatives Monsanto Mitt Romney Mike Johanns Michelle Obama Matt Blunt Land O Lakes Kraft Foods Kelli Powers Katie Smith John W. Hanley John Qualls John Block Jim Talent Jerry Crawford Jay Vroom Jack Kingston IUD Institute for Sustainability Howard Schneiderman GMO Food gmo George Bush Frank Reining Frank Lucas flax FDA Eastman Chemical Earle Harbison Dr. Earl Beaver Dan Quinn CropLife America Covalence Corn Chuck Conner Chris Policinski bovine growth hormone Bill Northey Bill Bain Bernie Sanders Bain Capital Arthur Fitzgerald American Soybean Association alfalfa Agent Orange Abigail Blunt A.G. Kawamura

Mitt Romney, Monsanto Man

by Wayne Barrett, September 12, 2012


This article was reported in collaboration with the Investigative Fund at the Nation Institute, where Barrett is a reporting fellow.


Though Mitt Romney has been campaigning for president since 2006, it’s alarming how little is known about critical chapters of his business biography. Nothing spells that out more clearly than his ties to Monsanto—the current target of a mid-September Occupy nationwide action—whose dark history features scandals involving PCBs, Agent Orange, bovine growth hormone, NutraSweet, IUD, genetically modified (GM) seed and herbicides, reaching back to the 1970s and ’80s. That’s when Monsanto was the largest consulting client of Romney’s employer, Bain & Company, and when Romney helped move Monsanto from chemical colossus to genetic giant, trading one set of environmental controversies for another.
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Genetic Crimes Unit to Protest Michael Taylor at the Food Safety Summit

Posted: April 12th, 2012 | Filed under: Events | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

food safety summit Genetic Crimes Unit to Protest Michael Taylor at the Food Safety Summit Washington Convention Center Washington USDA town hall Revolving Door resign Regulatory Capture rBGH Protest Michael Taylor King & Spalding Food Safety Summit Food Safety Czar FDA DC bovine growth hormone biohazmat

There is nothing safe about toxic pesticides & unlabeled genetically engineered foods. On April 19, 2012 the Occupy Monsanto Genetic Crimes Unit will protest outside of the Food Safety Summit at the Washington Convention Center. Food safety activists will meet at 11:00am at the Mount Vernon Square / 7th Street / Convention Center Metro station (Yellow & Green Line at the corner of M Street & 7th Street, NW) and will call on FDA Commissioner Michael Taylor to resign.

At 11:30am, former Monsanto executive, “Food Safety Czar” Michael Taylor will be answering questions at the Food Safety Summit “Town Hall” forum. The GCU is calling for Taylor’s immediate resignation because a former Monsanto lobbyist, who profits from the increased use of pesticides & genetically engineered foods, should not be determining food safety & labeling standards in America.

The Town Hall, as the forum is being called, is NOT open to the general public. Food Safety Summit attendees have paid at least $350 to attend. Occupy Monsanto’s 99%ers will take to the sidewalks dressed in Genetic Crimes Unit bio-hazmat uniforms to highlight the grave implications of chemical and genetic contamination in America’s food supply.

ABOUT MICHAEL TAYLORmichael taylor Genetic Crimes Unit to Protest Michael Taylor at the Food Safety Summit Washington Convention Center Washington USDA town hall Revolving Door resign Regulatory Capture rBGH Protest Michael Taylor King & Spalding Food Safety Summit Food Safety Czar FDA DC bovine growth hormone biohazmat
For over 30 years, Michael Taylor has been a part of the toxic revolving door between the public sector & the private sector. Starting 1976, Taylor became a staff attorney for the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), where he was executive assistant to the Commissioner. In 1981, he went into private practice at King & Spalding, a law firm representing chemical company Monsanto, where he established and led the firm’s “food and drug law” practice. A decade later, on July 17, 1991, Taylor left King & Spalding, returning to the FDA to fill the newly created post of Deputy Commissioner for Policy. While at the FDA, he also oversaw the policy regarding Monsanto’s genetically engineered bovine growth hormone (rbGH/rbST), which is injected into cows to increase milk production. Taylor asserted that milk from injected cows did not require any special labeling and wrote the white paper suggesting that if companies have the audacity to label their products as not using rbGH, they should also include a disclaimer stating that, according to the FDA, there is no difference between milk from treated and untreated cows. Between 1994 and 1996 he moved to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), where he was Administrator of the Food Safety & Inspection Service and was influential in the approval of unlabeled genetically modified foods entering the American food supply. After briefly returning to King & Spalding, he then returned to Monsanto to become Vice President for Public Policy from 1998 to 2001. Taylor has been a professor at the University of Maryland’s School of Medicine and in 2007 he became a Research Professor of Health Policy at the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services. On July 7, 2009, Taylor once again returned to government as “senior advisor” to the FDA Commissioner and on January 13, 2010, he was appointed to another newly created post at the FDA, this time as Deputy Commissioner for Foods, which makes him the second highest-ranking official at the FDA. Under his current tenure at the FDA, he’s been involved in the approval of genetically engineered alfalfa and is currently in support of genetically engineered salmon. Since August of last year, two on-line petitions, which call for President Obama to rescind his appointment of Taylor to the FDA, have gathered over 500,000 signatures.


UPDATE (4/20/2012) – Photos from the genetic crime scene outside of the Food Safety Summit are now on-line:
GCU Food Safety Summit5 Genetic Crimes Unit to Protest Michael Taylor at the Food Safety Summit Washington Convention Center Washington USDA town hall Revolving Door resign Regulatory Capture rBGH Protest Michael Taylor King & Spalding Food Safety Summit Food Safety Czar FDA DC bovine growth hormone biohazmat