This is a Call to Action for a
Non-Hierarchical Occupation of Monsanto Everywhere

Whether you like it or not, chances are Monsanto contaminated the food you ate today with chemicals and unlabeled GMOs. Monsanto controls much of the world's food supply at the expense of food democracy worldwide. This site is dedicated to empowering citizens of the world to take action against Monsanto & it's enablers like the FDA, USDA, EPA, GMA, BIO, and the processed food companies that use Monsanto's products.




Bill Maher Speaks to Gary Hirshberg about GMOs

Posted: October 20th, 2012 | Filed under: Video | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

HBO pulled this video. Sorry!

Political comedian Bill Maher discusses GMOs & Prop 37 with Just Label It Chair Gary Hirshberg on the October 19, 2012 episode of Real Time with Bill Maher.


Source: Youtube

AP/Huffington Post: World Food Prize Activities Incites Occupy Protest In Iowa

Posted: October 17th, 2012 | Filed under: Press | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

01LowDoesntWant e1349112622672 AP/Huffington Post: World Food Prize Activities Incites Occupy Protest In Iowa Syngenta Pioneer Hi Bred Paul Minehart Norman Borlaug Monsanto Kenneth Quinn Jane Slusark Iowa Green Revolution Frank Cordaro Foreign Service Dupont Des Moines Public Library Des Moines Daniel Hillel Cargill biotechnology Bayer CropScience Ban Ki moon

Photo taken in St. Louis 9/17/2012


World Food Prize Activities Incites Occupy Protest In Iowa

By DAVID PITT 10/17/12 07:19 PM

DES MOINES, Iowa — It’s difficult to argue with the goals of the World Food Prize Foundation – to recognize people who have helped improve the quality and availability of food to reduce world hunger.

But as the Des Moines-based foundation prepares for its 2012 award ceremony, which will be attended by dignitaries including Secretary-General of the United Nations Ban Ki-moon, dozens of protesters hope to disrupt the activities.

Members of Occupy Des Moines plan civil disobedience efforts and expect to be arrested as they obstruct participants at the World Food Prize headquarters on Wednesday and at the Iowa Capitol on Thursday before the $250,000 prize is awarded to this year’s recipient.

Organizer Frank Cordaro said he expected about 30 people to turn out Wednesday, with 10 willing to be arrested. By Wednesday afternoon, police arrested five activists on trespassing charges after they tried to enter a private event.

The group opposes what it sees as a focus on corporate agriculture motivated more by profit than food safety or protection of natural resources.

“The prize is corporate agriculture’s way of branding themselves in the minds of the American people as the good guys, the people who are feeding the hungry and the best last chance the human race has to meet our basic needs,” said Cordaro, 61, a former Roman Catholic priest who’s been jailed numerous times for acts of civil disobedience to social issues. “The truth is the prize is owned and scripted for corporate agriculture and large corporate entities who want to make a profit first and don’t really care about the planet.”

The protesters say the foundation also supports organizations that promote and sell crops that include genetically modified organisms, known as GMOs. While many scientists say genetic modification has been useful in developing crops resistant to pests, drought and disease, opponents worry it could result in harm to the environment or people.

World Food Prize Foundation President Kenneth Quinn, a retired career diplomat and Foreign Service officer for the U.S. Government, said he’s dealt with a variety of protests in his career, but he’s puzzled that people would object to an organization founded by a man who won a Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts to fight hunger. Norman Borlaug was honored in 1970 for work that boosted agricultural production in what has become known as the “Green Revolution.”

“I’m greatly disappointed that people would feel that his organization and his prize that he created, his goal of ending hunger in the world would somehow be worthy of disruption and civil disobedience,” Quinn said.

The prize created in 1986 has grown in stature in recent years, with hundreds of scholars and agribusiness leaders gathering for several days in Des Moines for speeches and seminars. Last year, the private, nonprofit foundation moved to the former Des Moines Public Library after a $30 million renovation paid in part with donations from companies including DuPont and Cargill.

Speakers from Monsanto Co., Bayer CropScience, and Syngenta have been invited to participate in events this week.

DuPont Pioneer spokeswoman Jane Slusark said the company respects protesters’ right to voice their opinions, but to fight hunger, “it’s going to take all of us working together, even if we do not always agree.”

Spokesmen for Monsanto and Syngenta also defended their companies’ efforts to develop technologies that boost crop production. Syngenta spokesman Paul Minehart said scientists have turned to genetic modification and other biotechnologies to boost food production as the world’s population increases.

“We don’t have more land and we don’t have more water that can be used efficiently and effectively for agriculture, so how are you going to be able to feed this growing population with limited resources?” Minehart asked. “We’re trying to make sure we are providing farmers what they need to be able to get the most yield and have the most productive crops that they can.”

Noting that “Dr. Borlaug believed in science,” Quinn said a panel discussion on biotechnology was planned this week because food production may depend on it as climate change brings more cycles of drought and flooding.

Ironically, while the protesters and some panels will focus on biotechnology and other facets of agribusiness, the winner of this year’s prize is being celebrated for low-tech work.

Israeli scientist Daniel Hillel, 81, helped develop drip irrigation methods that conserve water while allowing food to be grown in some of the world’s driest climates. The system Hillel developed, called micro-irrigation, carries water through narrow plastic pipes to plants, where it trickles continuously onto the roots. Over decades, it has dramatically improved farm production and helped thousands of Jewish and Muslim farmers.

Like some of those protesting the prize, Hillel has been concerned with preserving natural resources.

“We need to learn how to manage land so that it will not degrade and do it efficiently. At the same time, we must maintain natural ecosystems without encroaching upon them without excessive deforestation and destruction of biodiversity,” he told The Associated Press in a June interview when he was announced as this year’s winner.


Source: Huffington Post

Natural News: Whole Foods caught in GMO marketing deception, false advertising – here’s the proof:

Posted: October 8th, 2012 | Filed under: Genetic Crimes, Video | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |


(NaturalNews) A bombshell investigative video just released by Infowars.com has exposed what can only be called false and misleading advertising by Whole Foods. It all began when InfoWars reporters Aaron Dykes and Melissa Melton visited Whole Foods last week to try to find out what customers thought about Whole Foods stores selling so many unlabeled genetically modified foods. That fact was recently admitted by Whole Foods in its own blog post.

As you can see in the video, some customers were shocked to discover that Whole Foods sells GMOs in their store. The majority of Whole Foods customers, it turned out, had no idea the company was selling GMO.
(more…)

INCIDENT REPORT: Videos & Photos from Daytona Beach, Florida

Posted: September 18th, 2012 | Filed under: Incident Reports, Photos, Video | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |


Support Proposition 37 Event in Daytona Beach

By Kim & Steph on September 18, 2012

Kim1348012116 INCIDENT REPORT: Videos & Photos from Daytona Beach, Florida youtube signs Protest organic Home Depot GMO Labeling gmo Free Speech Florida FL Dupont Demonstration Decontamination Event Daytona Beach Chemicals All across America, events like the demonstration today, in Daytona Beach Florida, are taking place. What is all the excitement? It’s Proposition 37, which will be on the ballot for California voters this November. Californians are again, at the cutting edge of what could change America for the better. As the Silicon Valley pioneered computers and technology, they are pioneering this food fight against chemical companies such as Monsanto and DuPont.

For the first time, in American history, GMO labeling is getting on the ballot; Finally, GMO’s are going to have their day in the court of public opinion. Proposition 37 was an initiative brought forward by voters, therefore, it cannot be removed from the ballot in California. In other cases, Monsanto has threatened lawsuits and states have backed down from this battle, however, California’s governing officials canNOT remove this initiative from the ballot based on California law. A clear victory for the Ballot Initiative Process in California.

This issue has been bought, intimidated and threatened out of many courtrooms, but this time, Monsanto’s money won’t buy or bully the outcome. It is up to the voters. It is up to us. Let’s work together to help others become aware of the dangers and unknowns of GMO’s. Let’s support Proposition 37 from where we are, to encourage those fighting on the front lines, to continue fighting the good fight.

I will be posting videos about our event in Daytona Beach Florida! There will be more events planned across the nation as election day nears. You are invited to stand with us as we stand against GMO’s.





+ SFGgardens: Support Proposition 37 Event in Daytona Beach

San Diego Reader: Women Occupy San Diego lead rally supporting Prop 37

Posted: September 18th, 2012 | Filed under: Press | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |
09.18.12 wtf im eating t670 San Diego Reader: Women Occupy San Diego lead rally supporting Prop 37 Women Occupy San Diego Women San Diego Reader Ronald K. Fong Proposition 37 Prop 37. Occupellas Monsanto March labeling GMO Labeling gmo food Dupont Dow Demonstration Chemical California Grocers Association Activist

Photograph by Dave Rice

Women Occupy San Diego lead rally supporting Prop 37

Dave Rice, September 18, 2012, San Diego Reader

Yesterday saw a handful of new developments in the push to align voters either in favor of or against Proposition 37, a measure that would require food producers who knowingly use genetically modified crops to label them as such, and prevent such producers from referring to their products as “natural.”

Women Occupy San Diego, one of the lasting and perhaps most prominent local groups to emerge from the Occupy Wall Street movement that began one year ago yesterday, organized a rally at the Hillcrest headquarters of Canvass for a Cause on Monday afternoon.

Several speakers decried the potential health impacts from genetically altered products, noting that the products have been shown to contain increased levels of allergens and that modified crops, marketed by chemical giant Monsanto as “Roundup-ready,” are treated with considerably higher doses of herbicides, as the seeds have been engineered to resist the effects of the company’s signature weed killer, allowing farmers to douse their entire crops at will to control weeds.

The Occupellas, a chorus group featuring members of Women Occupy, sang familiar yet re-branded tunes such as “Old Monsanto Had a Farm,” and a crew of demonstrators arrived with a large “Monster of Monsanto” prop that accompanied the crowd, which had swelled to over 100, as they marched toward the SR-163 overpass at Robinson Avenue.

Original plans had called for a second group of protesters to demonstrate on the bridge crossing University at the 163, but as of shortly after 5 p.m. only one bridge was occupied. Several police cruisers stood by to survey the action, but neither the demonstrators nor members of the public seemed inclined to violence.

Meanwhile, backers and detractors of the Prop 37 campaign sent out dueling press releases.

The Yes contingent seeks to draw attention to new funding received by its opponent, information made public by the state last Friday. Monsanto gave the No campaign another $2.9 million, raising its total stake in defeating the proposition to $7.1 million. Other pesticide companies recently upped their investments, including DuPont ($874,800), Dow AgroSciences ($815,200), Bayer CropScience ($381,600), BASF Plant Science ($357,700), and Syngenta ($178,700).

These groups, which measure proponents are calling the “Big 6 pesticide firms” have contributed $19 million of the $32 million raised so far by those opposing the proposition.

Others investing heavily in defeating Prop 37 include Pepsi ($1,716,300 to date), Nestle USA ($1,169,400), Coca-Cola ($1,164,400), and ConAgra Foods ($1,076,700). At number 7 on the list of highest donors, only Nestle USA (itself a subsidiary of the Swiss parent company) is based in California.

Opponents of 37 didn’t leave long to question where the influx of cash would go, announcing a major buy of radio ads to be aired statewide beginning yesterday.

“Prop. 37 is about the right to sue,” says California Grocers Association president Ronald K. Fong in a statement accompanying the ad copy. “And when it is time to sue, grocery retailers will be at the head of the line to get hit with a lawsuit. Lawyers need no proof, no damages prior to filing the lawsuit.”

The ad makes similar claims, and also says that the new labeling requirements would “increase food costs for a typical California family by hundreds of dollars per year” while “[giving] trial lawyers a special new right to file shakedown lawsuits.”

The ad closes by advertising “FactsOn37.com,” a website that was not active as of Monday evening, though the campaign website makes many similar claims and links to the study that is the basis of the figure given on higher food costs, finding that the costs of food prices could rise $4.5-$5.2 billion if the proposition is passed, mainly because producers would prefer using non-bioengineered crops to having to disclose their continued use.

“It’s an infinitesimal amount cost per product, but they’re going to say it’ll cost you hundreds,” predicted Jeffrey Smith, a consumer activist and author on genetically modified crops, in a statement about a week before the survey was posted to the No on 37 website. Smith was speaking about the cost of continuing to use the same products while producing packaging compliant with the new law, which producers are widely expected to shy away from due to real or perceived concerns from consumers regarding laboratory-altered food.

While no other U.S. state currently has such a law on the books, 50 countries including China, India, Japan, and all of Europe requires such disclosure.


Source: San Diego Reader


+ More Photos & Videos

The Garden Island: Kaua‘i is Ground Zero for Occupy GMO

Posted: September 18th, 2012 | Filed under: Press | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |
occupy monsanto tom laventure the garden island The Garden Island: Kaua‘i is Ground Zero for Occupy GMO Wendy Raebeck Vietnam USDA Tiana Laranio Syngenta SPAM Sol Kahn self empowerment Russell Kokubun rice Research Pioneer Hi Bred pesticides Michael Schultz Lopaka Baptista Kekaha keiki Kauai Josephine Bonaparte International Food Information Council Hawaii Department of Agriculture Hawaii Board of Agriculture Hawaii Ground Zero GMO Free gmo Fern Holland Eastside Dupont ConAgra Foods BASF Atrizine Agent Orange

Kaua‘i is Ground Zero for Occupy GMO

September 18, 2012, 1:00 am, Tom LaVenture – The Garden Island

LIHU‘E — Genetically modified organisms were the focus of a worldwide Occupy movement on Monday, and demonstrators in Lihu‘e said Kaua‘i is Ground Zero with experimental seed testing.

Most of the world was holding an Occupy Monsanto protest, a GMO company that has since departed Kaua‘i, but still has operations in Hawai‘i. The Lihu‘e demonstration focused on all major growers conducting testing, including Kaua‘i companies Syngenta and DuPont/Pioneer, along with ConAgra Foods, Inc. and BASF SE.

The issues were about expansion of testing fields from Kekaha to the Eastside, and the referendum to require labeling of GMO products in foods.

“I just want to know what I am eating,” said Sol Kahn, a demonstrator at the protest. “I don’t want to eat GMOs if I choose not to. It needs to be labeled with more information, and there needs to be more research.”

Kahn fears that poisons in the drinking water and soil is killing microorganisms and bacteria that are beneficial to life. The results of leaching pollution is killing the oceans, reefs and fish, he said.

“I am not necessarily against it (GMOs), but the science of it needs to be inspected,” he added.

Michael Schultz was demonstrating about the wealth of university research on pesticides and herbicides that damage the land and environment.

“I’ve been concerned about this for many years since the end of the cane industry,” Schultz said. “We are not just eating GMO food, but we are the guinea pigs for all these toxins.”

Fern Holland said she began researching the GMO issue five years ago as a student of environmental science, marine biology and wildlife management. She said studies from the Institute of Responsible Technology shows GMOs are not doing the right thing.

“They are chemical companies that are genetically modifying the world’s food supply to need chemicals,” she said.

The GMO issue should unify creationists and evolutionists, who agree that open testing of the world’s food supply is unacceptable. They also believe that breading across species is fundamentally wrong, she said.

“It might be an amazing technology to benefit pharmaceuticals and biotech,” she said, “but it needs to be treated unsafe until proven safe.”

Only numbers will make a difference, and Holland said that monthly community meeting for people on all sides of the issue will follow. She hopes to get 30,000 people to join the cause.

There are currently two lawsuits in state circuit and federal court against seed companies on Kaua‘i. The suits claim that violations of dust suppression orders are poisoning neighboring communities and are preventing organic farms from maintaining its status.

“The Hawai‘i Department of Agriculture supports all forms of legitimate agriculture, which includes conventional farming, biotech farming and organic farming,” said Janelle Saneishi, a public information officer for the department.

Hawai‘i Board of Agriculture Chairman Russell Kokubun was out of state and not available for comment.

Biotech farming is regulated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and once it approves a crop for planting, it is considered like any other plant, she said. Research crops must also follow USDA conditions, but once approved for release they are considered a deregulated crop and not experimental, she added.

As of now, there does not appear to be scientific evidence of harm, she said. Biotech is regulated by USDA permits including inspections quarantine branch facilities.

“We do have some input into how they grow and the inspectors look at how they are following permit conditions and USDA regulations,” she said.

Lopaka Baptista said he grows his own garden and wants his family to have good food on the table. The GMOs ruins everything, he said, referring to his brother who suffers from the effects of Agent Orange during the war in Vietnam.

He said that Atrizine in the water supply is also deadly for humans, pets, animals and birds of Kaua‘i.

“My concern is for my family, my friends and neighbors,” Baptista said. “We have a lot of keiki and we don’t want them growing up in an environment where you cant even drink the water anymore.”

“This issue is important to me and its pretty critical that people of Kaua‘i participate in a meaningful way,” Wendy Raebeck said. “I am really heartened because a demonstration just two years ago people were asking what GMO is, when it’s now a mainstream issue and it needed to happen.”

Corn, soy and canola are taboo items to Raebeck. She buys only organic tofu and soy milk.

“I’m against GMOs and I’m for labeling foods so that we know what is in it,” said Josephine Bonaparte, an organic farmer and grandmother. “I want a life free of pesticides and free from food that is pesticide resistant.”

Tiana Laranio said she was raised a “GMO youth” on microwavable groceries and canned SPAM, sausage and white rice. She suffered from reproductive and gastrointestinal problems at a young age and said she saw a connection with food allergies.

“I started becoming aware, and really once you wake up, there is not turning back,” she said. “I want to help other people to wake up for themselves.”

She said Occupy is about self-empowerment through community outreach and education. She said people can learn to read labels and demand that stores sell GMO-free products.

Once people know and they choose the alternative, then the natural forces of the free market will make the adjustment. As for Hawai‘i, she would like to see remediation of the ceded lands used for sustainable programs that get more people working with community gardens.

As for protesting, this is Laranio’s first time and she was motivated by the sudden growth of GMO fields around the island.

“I don’t agree with what the GMOs do, but if they do it then they should do it in a lab and not in the open air of Kaua‘i,” she said. “We are all being poisoned whether we realize it or not, and I am not a science experiment. I did not agree to this.”

Calls to Syngenta were not returned by press time.

DuPont Pioneer responded with resources that explain the work of GMOs on Kaua‘i at www.hciaonline.org.

More Hawai‘i seed industry surveys and information on biotech food safety is available from the International Food Information Council at www.foodinsight.org.


Source: The Garden Island


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