This is a Call to Action for a
Non-Hierarchical Occupation of Monsanto Everywhere

Whether you like it or not, chances are Monsanto contaminated the food you ate today with chemicals and unlabeled GMOs. Monsanto controls much of the world's food supply at the expense of food democracy worldwide. This site is dedicated to empowering citizens of the world to take action against Monsanto & it's enablers like the FDA, USDA, EPA, GMA, BIO, and the processed food companies that use Monsanto's products.




New York Times: Major Grocer to Label Foods With Gene-Modified Content

Posted: March 8th, 2013 | Filed under: Press | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

stop gmo food contamination New York Times: Major Grocer to Label Foods With Gene Modified Content World Health Organization Whole Foods Market Whole Foods Washington Wal Mart Voters twitter Soybeans Saffron Road Republicans Proposition 37 poll Pepsico OPLIY Non GMO Project Missouri Mellman Group Mark Kastel Louis Finkel legislatures Legislation Karen Batra just label it Grocery Manufacturers Association Grocery GMO Soybeans GMO Labeling GMO Corn genetically modified ingredients Gary Hirshberg Food and Drug Administration FDA facebook eat in Democrats Customers Cornucopia Institute Corn Coca Cola California bovine growth hormone biotech industry BIO American Medical Association American Halal Company A.C. Gallo

Safe Food Action St. Louis outside Whole Foods Market in Brentwood, MO

Major Grocer to Label Foods With Gene-Modified Content

By Stephanie Strom

Whole Foods Market, the grocery chain, on Friday became the first retailer in the United States to require labeling of all genetically modified foods sold in its stores, a move that some experts said could radically alter the food industry.
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A. C. Gallo, president of Whole Foods, said the new labeling requirement, to be in place within five years, came in response to consumer demand. “We’ve seen how our customers have responded to the products we do have labeled,” Mr. Gallo said. “Some of our manufacturers say they’ve seen a 15 percent increase in sales of products they have labeled.”

Genetically modified ingredients are deeply embedded in the global food supply, having proliferated since the 1990s. Most of the corn and soybeans grown in the United States, for example, have been genetically modified. The alterations make soybeans resistant to a herbicide used in weed control, and causes the corn to produce its own insecticide. Efforts are under way to produce a genetically altered apple that will spoil less quickly, as well as genetically altered salmon that will grow faster. The announcement ricocheted around the food industry and excited proponents of labeling. “Fantastic,” said Mark Kastel, co-director of the Cornucopia Institute, an organic advocacy group that favors labeling.

The Grocery Manufacturers Association, the trade group that represents major food companies and retailers, issued a statement opposing the move. “These labels could mislead consumers into believing that these food products are somehow different or present a special risk or a potential risk,” Louis Finkel, the organization’s executive director of government affairs, said in the statement.

Mr. Finkel noted that the Food and Drug Administration, as well as regulatory and scientific bodies including the World Health Organization and the American Medical Association, had deemed genetically modified products safe.

The labeling requirements announced by Whole Foods will include its 339 stores in the United States and Canada. Since labeling is already required in the European Union, products in its seven stores in Britain are already marked if they contain genetically modified ingredients. The labels currently used show that a product has been verified as free of genetically engineered ingredients by the Non GMO Project, a nonprofit certification organization. The labels Whole Foods will use in 2018, which have yet to be created, will identify foods that contain such ingredients.

The shift by Whole Foods is the latest in a series of events that has intensified the debate over genetically modified foods. Voters defeated a hard-fought ballot initiative in California late last year after the biotech industry, and major corporations like PepsiCo and Coca-Cola, spent millions of dollars to fight the effort. Other initiatives have qualified for the ballot in Washington State and Missouri, while consumers across the country have been waging a sort of guerrilla movement in supermarkets, pasting warning stickers on products suspected of having G.M.O. ingredients from food companies that oppose labeling. Proponents of labeling insist that consumers have a right to know about the ingredients in the food they eat, and they contend that some studies in rats show that bioengineered food can be harmful.

Gary Hirshberg, chairman of Just Label It, a campaign for a federal requirement to label foods containing genetically modified ingredients, called the Whole Foods decision a “game changer.”

“We’ve had some pretty big developments in labeling this year,” Mr. Hirshberg said, adding that 22 states now have some sort of pending labeling legislation. “Now, one of the fastest-growing, most successful retailers in the country is throwing down the gantlet.”

He compared the potential impact of the Whole Foods announcement to Wal-Mart’s decision several years ago to stop selling milk from cows treated with growth hormone. Today, only a small number of milk cows are injected with the hormone.

Karen Batra, a spokeswoman for BIO, a trade group representing the biotech industry, said it was too early to determine what impact, if any, the Whole Foods decision would have. “It looks like they want to expand their inventory of certified organic and non-G.M.O. lines,” Ms. Batra said. “The industry has always supported the voluntary labeling of food for marketing reasons.”

She contended, however, that without scientific evidence showing that genetically modified foods caused health or safety issues, labeling was unnecessary.

Nonetheless, companies have shown a growing willingness to consider labeling. Some 20 major food companies, as well as Wal-Mart, met recently in Washington to discuss genetically modified labeling.

Coincidentally, the American Halal Company, a food company whose Saffron Road products are sold in Whole Foods stores, on Friday introduced the first frozen food, a chickpea and spinach entree, that has been certified not to contain genetically modified ingredients.

More than 90 percent of respondents to a poll of potential voters in the 2012 elections, conducted by the Mellman Group in February last year, were in favor of labeling genetically modified foods. Some 93 percent of Democrats and 89 percent of Republicans in the poll, which had a margin of error of plus or minus 3.1 percent, favored it.

But in the fight over the California initiative, Proposition 37, the opponents succeeded in persuading voters that labeling would have a negative effect on food prices and the livelihood of farmers.

That fight, however, has cost food companies in other ways. State legislatures and regulatory agencies are pondering labeling on their own, and consumers have been aggressive in criticizing some of the companies that fought the initiative, using Twitter and Facebook to make their views known.

Buoyed by what they see as some momentum in the labeling war, consumers, organic farmers and food activists plan to hold an “eat-in” outside the F.D.A.’s offices next month to protest government policies on genetically modified crops and foods. Whole Foods, which specializes in organic products, tends to be favored by those types of consumers, and it enjoys strong sales of its private-label products, whose composition it controls. The company thus risks less than some more traditional food retailers in taking a stance on labeling.

In 2009, Whole Foods began submitting products in its 365 Everyday Value private-label line to verification by the Non GMO Project.

But even Whole Foods has not been immune to criticism on the G.M.O. front. A report by Cornucopia, “Cereal Crimes,” revealed that its 365 Corn Flakes line contained genetically modified corn. By the time the report came out in October 2011, the product had been reformulated and certified as organic.

Today, Whole Foods’ shelves carry some 3,300 private-label and branded products that are certified, the largest selection of any grocery chain in the country.

Mr. Gallo said Whole Foods did not consult with its suppliers about its decision and informed them of it only shortly before making its announcement Friday. He said Whole Foods looked forward to working with suppliers on the labeling.


Source: New York Times

Whole Foods Market© commits to full GMO transparency

Posted: March 8th, 2013 | Filed under: Press Releases, Video | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

whole foods gmo transparency Whole Foods Market© commits to full GMO transparency youtube Whole Foods Market Whole Foods Walter Robb Transparency supply chain Stores organic Non GMO Project Monsanto just label it Honesty GMO Labeling gmo Genetically Modified Organisms Food labels Expo West agriculture A.C. Gallo

Whole Foods Market© commits to full GMO transparency

Company supports consumer’s right to know by setting five-year deadline for labeling GMOs

Whole Foods Market announced today at Natural Products Expo West that, by 2018, all products in its U.S. and Canadian stores1 must be labeled to indicate if they contain genetically modified organisms (GMOs)2. Whole Foods Market is the first national grocery chain to set a deadline for full GMO transparency.

“We are putting a stake in the ground on GMO labeling to support the consumer’s right to know,” said Walter Robb, co-CEO of Whole Foods Market. “The prevalence of GMOs in the U.S. paired with nonexistent mandatory labeling makes it very difficult for retailers to source non-GMO options and for consumers to choose non-GMO products. Accordingly, we are stepping up our support of certified organic agriculture, where GMOs are not allowed, and we are working together with our supplier partners to grow our non-GMO supply chain to ensure we can continue to provide these choices in the future.”

Whole Foods Market has been collaborating with many of its supplier partners for several years to source products without GMO ingredients. In 2009, the company began putting its 365 Everyday Value™ line through Non-GMO Project™ verification and encouraged its grocery supplier partners to do the same. Whole Foods Market currently sells 3,300 Non-GMO Project verified products from 250 brands, more than any other retailer in North America. It will now expand this effort, working with suppliers in all categories as they transition to ingredients from non-GMO sources, or clearly label products containing GMOs by the five-year deadline. Whole Foods Market will make announcements about progress and key milestones along the way.

“We’re responding to our customers, who have consistently asked us for GMO labeling and we are doing so by focusing on where we have control: in our own stores,” said Robb.

GMOs are now part of an ongoing national conversation, thanks to efforts of various advocacy groups such as JustLabelIt.org and to individual states considering their own mandatory labeling laws, like the efforts that are now underway in Washington state. “Whole Foods Market supports that measure and looks forward to supporting other state efforts that may finally lead to one uniform set of national standards,” said Robb. “While we are encouraged by the many mandatory labeling initiatives, we are committed to moving forward with our own GMO transparency plan now.”

“We have always believed that quality and transparency are inseparable and that providing detailed information about the products we offer—such as 5-Step Animal Welfare ratings in meat, Eco Scale rated cleaning products in grocery, stringent wild and farm-raised standards in seafood, and now labeling GMOs throughout the store—is part of satisfying and delighting the millions of people who place their trust in Whole Foods Market each day,” said A.C. Gallo, president of Whole Foods Market. “This bold task will encourage manufacturers to ask deeper questions about ingredients, and it will help us provide greater transparency about the products we sell so our customers can be empowered to make informed decisions about the foods that are best for them.”

Until there is GMO labeling, consumers can rely on Non-GMO Project verified products and certified organic products if they want to avoid GMOs. The U.S. National Organic Standards prohibit the intentional use of GMO seed in the production of organic crops. As a pioneer in the U.S. organic food movement for the past 32 years, Whole Foods Market now offers thousands of organic products, the largest variety in the country.

1 The company has 7 stores in the U.K., which already requires labeling for all foods or feeds that intentionally contain or are produced from GMO ingredients.

2 Plants that have been altered through a technique that changes their genetic makeup, producing new combination of genes and traits that do not occur in nature, including the possibility of the introduction genes from other species, are called genetically modified organisms (GMOs) or genetically engineered (GE) foods.


Source: Whole Foods

Whole Foods Market Memo to Employees about World Food Day Activism

Posted: October 15th, 2012 | Filed under: Incident Reports | Tags: , , , , , , , , |
whole foods world food day Whole Foods Market Memo to Employees about World Food Day Activism World Food Day Whole Foods Market WFM Protest Proposition 37 Prop 37. Non GMO Project GMO Labeling Activism

On Tuesday, October 16, food activists around the world will be celebrating World Food Day in a various ways. One of which, will be going to Whole Foods Market and demand the stores stop selling unlabeled GMO foods.


Below is the transcribed text of the memo to Whole Foods Market employees on how to handle World Food Day activism:

WORLD FOOD DAY – OCTOBER 16 – ALL WFM STORES

WHAT: On Oct. 16, anti-GMO activists across the country are planning to stage demonstrations at many stores throughout the country. The demonstration will involve people coming to stores to return products that are “non-labeled GMO items.” Some may buy products – or even try to steal them – and then seek to return them immediately. This could cause a lot of congestion in stores and be really distracting all day, depending on the number of people participating, and how many products they try to return.

The overall purpose of World Food Day is to highlight hunger around the world. From their website: “On October 16 – World Food Day, join the global movement to end hunger. Be a part of the solution and take action in your community and around the world. We can end hunger. It will take all of us.” Refer to this site (you may need to refresh it for the latest info) to find out what Word Food Day events are going on in your area:
http://www.worldfooddayusa.org/events

WHY: California has a ballot initiative coming up for a vote on Nov. 6 that would require labeling of food products that many contain GMOs – Proposition 37. Even though we have announced our support for Prop 37, many groups have targeted Whole Foods Market because we are seen as not truly supportive and/or secretly against labeling GMOs because:

  • We are not giving financial donations to help the ballot initiative pass
  • An ongoing negative online media campaign has accused WFM of lying to customers about GMOs in our stores
  • STRATEGY: This is an opportunity to demonstrate our true support for GMO labeling, and to educate shoppers about GMOs in general and our efforts over the years to provide Non-GMO product choices.

  • If your store has some Team Members who are knowledgeable about the GMO issue, you could set up a prominently displayed “GMO Info Kiosk” where TMs answer questions, provide information about GMOs and Non-GMO options available in the sore.
  • Schedule tastings of Non-GMO Project Verified 365 Private Label products, and use that opportunity to discuss how we source non-GMO ingredients for that product line.
  • Remind shoppers of the upcoming weekend sale of Non-GMO Products Oct. 19-21!
  • Global may have some new/additional messaging, stay tuned.

  • Click here to read more details about World Food Day activism

    Natural News: Whole Foods caught in GMO marketing deception, false advertising – here’s the proof:

    Posted: October 8th, 2012 | Filed under: Genetic Crimes, Video | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |


    (NaturalNews) A bombshell investigative video just released by Infowars.com has exposed what can only be called false and misleading advertising by Whole Foods. It all began when InfoWars reporters Aaron Dykes and Melissa Melton visited Whole Foods last week to try to find out what customers thought about Whole Foods stores selling so many unlabeled genetically modified foods. That fact was recently admitted by Whole Foods in its own blog post.

    As you can see in the video, some customers were shocked to discover that Whole Foods sells GMOs in their store. The majority of Whole Foods customers, it turned out, had no idea the company was selling GMO.
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    INCIDENT REPORT: Occupy Monsanto goes to the home of Monsanto

    Posted: September 29th, 2012 | Filed under: Incident Reports | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    03ErmalRats e1348275986158 INCIDENT REPORT: Occupy Monsanto goes to the home of Monsanto Whole Foods Market Suzanne Renard STL Stan Cox St. Louis Safe Food Action St. Louis Rats Priti Cox Picket Orin Langelle Organic Consumers Association Occupy Monsanto MO Millennium Hotel International Symposium on Biosafety of Genetically Modified Organisms GMO Free Midwest GMO Labeling gmo GM soy Global Justice Ecology Project Gateway Green Alliance Fisher Wellness Center Eric Herm Dr. Ollie Fisher Dr. Irina Ermakova Don Fitz death Creve Coeur cotton Carmelo Ruiz Marrero CAMP Brian Tokar Black Bear Bakery biotechnology Barbara Chicherio Anne Peterman
    Photo by Don Fitz


    Occupy Monsanto goes to the home of Monsanto

    By Carmelo Ruiz Marrero

    In the city of St. Louis, there is no one who does not have a friend, relative or neighbor working at Monsanto. This city on the banks of the Mississippi river has the doubtful honor of hosting the world headquarters of the Monsanto corporation. Founded in 1901, it was one of the world’s leading chemical companies in the twentieth century. At the start of this century it transformed itself into a biotechnology giant, or as the company likes to put it, “a leader in the life sciences industry”. Nowadays, Monsanto is the world’s largest seed company (global market share: 27%) and owns over four fifths of the planet’s genetically modified (GM) seed.

    Monsanto is therefore the very embodiment of the biotech-agricultural-industrial complex, the company has worked very hard to earn that distinction. That also means that it symbolizes everything that is wrong with the food system.

    Monday September 17 was the Occupy Monsanto campaign’s international day of actions against the corporation (1). Concerned citizens all over the world were called upon to carry out protest actions at the Monsanto facility nearest to them. Groups as far away as Chile and Argentina picketed Monsanto offices and circulated photos of their actions on social media.

    That day I was, of all places, in St. Louis picketing the company headquarters’ main entrance. I was accompanied by dozens of local activists plus some who came from as far away as Chicago and the San Francisco bay area (2). Among the demonstrators who addressed the small crowd was Texas farmer Eric Herm, who used to plant Monsanto’s GM Roundup Ready cotton but turned against chemical and biotech agriculture. He narrates his journey of discovery and transformation in his book “Son of a Farmer, Child of the Earth” (3).

    This picket was the culmination of two days of protests and educational events organized by GMO Free Midwest (4) and Occupy Monsanto. A series of events were hosted by Safe Food Action, the Gateway Green Alliance (5) and the US Organic Consumers Association (6) in different parts of the city to agitate and educate about the threat of GM crops and foods to human health, small farmers, rural economies, and food sovereignty worldwide.

    On Sunday the 16th the organizers held a day-long series of educational activities, including talks and film screenings, in the Community Arts and Movement (CAMP) (7) building between Cherokee street and Minnesota Avenue in South St. Louis, and the Black Bear Bakery a short walk away. CAMP is a community organization that promotes creative expression, social interconnection, healthy living and sustainability through a great variety of activities that celebrate diversity and encourage critical thinking, such as classes, projects, artists in residence, bicycle repair, community gardening, mural painting, and much more. The Black Bear Bakery, known for its Lickhalter rye bread, is a worker-owned collective that hosts a great deal of cultural, political and creative activities, including music performances, film screenings, meetings, presentations and press conferences (8).

    Presenters that day included Dr. Ollie Fisher, a former Monsanto employee who turned his life around and is now dedicated to promoting integral holistic health and operates the Fisher Wellness Center (9); Priti Cox, an artist from India (10) who has been chronicling and analyzing the devastating effects of corporate globalization on Indian society; geneticist and author Stan Cox (11), who works at the Kansas-based Land Institute developing deep-rooted perennial food crops (12); Orin Langelle and Anne Peterman, both from the Global Justice Ecology Project (13), who work on a variety of issues ranging from climate justice to the campaign to stop GM trees; social and environmental justice activist Daniel “Digger” Romano, who helps create local food networks as an alternative to the corporate-dominated agrotoxic food system; organic farmer, beekeeper and teacher Suzanne Renard; Eric Herm, and myself.

    In my presentation I provided a political and historical context to the current global battle around GM crops and the patenting of seeds, basing myself on two recent articles of mine, “The Grand Botanical Chess Game” (14) and “Seeds of Empire” (15). This is part of a much broader research work I’m doing on the geopolitics of seeds and genomes, from a social ecology perspective.

    The following day was the big day: Occupy Monsanto Day. Activities began with a conference on the myths and realities of the much-ballyhooed “green economy” at the Millennium hotel in the downtown area, with Don Fitz of the Gateway Green Alliance and Orin Langelle as presenters and myself as moderator. On the same floor of the Millenium a biotech industry-sponsored international scientific symposium on the biosafety of genetically modified organisms (GMO’s) was taking place that same day. Not a coincidence, but rather clever planning and foresight. Months earlier, professor Brian Tokar of the Vermont-based Institute for Social Ecology informed GMO Free Midwest organizer Barbara Chicherio of the upcoming industry symposium, noting that it would coincide with the Occupy Monsanto actions. So the protest organizers cleverly booked the Lewis & Clarke conference room in the hotel, directly across the hall from where the industry activity would take place.

    But things did not go as planned. We were changed at last minute to a different conference room on the far end of the floor, half the size of the space that had been paid for. Here is Don Fitz’s account of what happened when Chicherio brought our complaint to the hotel executive in charge:

    – “If you don’t stop talking to me, I will have you removed from the hotel,” was the most thoughtful answer he seemed able to come up with. Looking at his name tag, Barbara saw that he was “Rich Martin, Director of Catering and Convention Services.”

    As the conversation was unfolding, Orin Langelle with the Global Justice Ecology Project (GJEP) pulled out his camera to film the interaction. Rich put up his hand, growling “No photos! You get away from me or I’ll have you removed from the hotel.” Nearby Orin was Anne Petermann, also with GJEP. She slid her camera away as she quietly caught Rich on film. –

    Fitz’s full account plus some photos of the activity are available at the Occupy Monsanto site (16).

    A Russian scientist participating at the industry symposium came over and briefly joined us as the conference was starting. It was none other than Irina Ermakova. Her name may be little-known to the American general public but she is a celebrity and hero among anti-GM activists. In 2007 she published the results of her ground-breaking animal feeding studies on GM soy. In short, she found that the offspring of rats fed GM soy had a death rate of 50% within three weeks of birth, when the normal rate is 10%. For her findings, Ermakova was badly abused by biotech crop supporters, particularly the editors of Nature Biotechnology magazine (17). Apparently, the industry symposium’s organizers felt they needed a token radical voice in their activity lest they be accused of “bias”. It was a pleasant surprise and a total thrill to have her briefly join us and address our conference. Later, she joined us again when we had an anti-GM picket across the street from the hotel.

    Our following action of the day was at the local Whole Foods Market, the Wal-Mart of the organic movement (18). The Whole Foods retail chain, which many consumers believe sells only organic, natural, healthy, wholesome and of above average quality foods, actually sells some GM among its many items that are not labeled “organic”. No, not everything they sell is organic, and if it isn’t then there is no guarantee that it’s GM-free. Whole Foods does not have a GM-free policy and does not even support mandatory labels on GM foods. We walked up and down the aisles talking to customers about GM foods and the importance of labeling them. The reception among the clientele was overwhelmingly positive, and even employees wanted to know about the issues. Other members of our group took non-organic items to the cash register and questioned the cashiers whether their purchases were GM-free. There were no unpleasant clashes with the store’s management and there were no arrests, even though police did show up.

    The grand event of the day was the picket at the main entrance to Monsanto’s main offices, in the Creve Coeur suburb (19). What surprised us was the number of passerby drivers who expressed their approval and solidarity with our protest. That is no small thing in the world’s ultimate biotech company town.

    – Ruiz-Marrero is a Puerto Rican author, environmental educator, and long-time activist on biotech issues. He currently works at the Organic Consumers Association coordinating social media campaigns. Ruiz-Marrero, a graduate of the Institute for Social Ecology’s MA program, has been involved with Green politics since the 1980’s, when he was active in the Green Committees of Correspondence. He is currently on the editorial board of Synthesis/Regeneration, a journal of Green social thought (http://www.greens.org/s-r/).

    FOOTNOTES:
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    INCIDENT REPORT: Atlanta’s Food Supply Rescue Coalition Holds March Calling for End to Monsanto’s Genetically Engineered Food System

    Posted: September 27th, 2012 | Filed under: Incident Reports, Photos | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |
    sean suddes occupy monsanto atlanta8 INCIDENT REPORT: Atlantas Food Supply Rescue Coalition Holds March Calling for End to Monsantos Genetically Engineered Food System Whole Foods Market USDA Steven Wing Publix Protest Proposition 37 Prop 37. Nina Roark McDonalds March Kroger Jaye Crawford Home Depot Georgia GCU GA Food Supply Rescue Coalition FDA Demonstration Atlanta ATL Agent Orange
    All photos by Sean Suddes

    Atlanta’s Food Supply Rescue Coalition Holds March Calling for End to Monsanto’s Genetically Engineered Food System.

    By Effe Slayer

    Standing outside an Atlanta Kroger grocery store, food advocate Steven Wing reads lyrics to a crowd of protestors and curious shoppers.

    “If you’re gonna play God with my food.
    If you’re gonna play God and leave organic farmer’s screwed.
    If you’re gonna play God with my decisions….
    If you’re gonna play God I want a new religion.”

    sean suddes occupy monsanto atlanta19 INCIDENT REPORT: Atlantas Food Supply Rescue Coalition Holds March Calling for End to Monsantos Genetically Engineered Food System Whole Foods Market USDA Steven Wing Publix Protest Proposition 37 Prop 37. Nina Roark McDonalds March Kroger Jaye Crawford Home Depot Georgia GCU GA Food Supply Rescue Coalition FDA Demonstration Atlanta ATL Agent Orange

    In a moment that is being referred to as “the food fight of the decade“, the lyrics to “Tell Us What You’re Growing“, written by an Arizona songwriter, Celia, couldn’t be more poignant.

    The group of protesters is participating in the “Occupy Monsanto Global Day of Action”. They’re on a mission to raise awareness about lab-created genetically modified organisms (GMOs) within the food supply. With rally stops at five “Monsanto Points of Distribution” locations – Publix, Kroger, Home Depot, Whole Foods Market, and McDonald’s – the Occupy Monsanto Genetic Crimes Unit (GCU) declares each location a genetic crime scene for their sale of Monsanto’s toxic products.

    sean suddes occupy monsanto atlanta4 INCIDENT REPORT: Atlantas Food Supply Rescue Coalition Holds March Calling for End to Monsantos Genetically Engineered Food System Whole Foods Market USDA Steven Wing Publix Protest Proposition 37 Prop 37. Nina Roark McDonalds March Kroger Jaye Crawford Home Depot Georgia GCU GA Food Supply Rescue Coalition FDA Demonstration Atlanta ATL Agent Orange

    “This is a decontamination zone”, declares Vince C. through a megaphone. He is dressed in a biohazard suit. “If you’ve been contaminated by Monsanto’s toxins, you’ll need to be tagged.” Shoppers are outfitted with special hospital wristbands to symbolize a health biohazard.

    “There’s something wrong when the chemical manufacturer Monsanto, the same company that made Agent Orange, owns our commercial food supply”, says Food Supply Rescue Coalition‘s Jaye Crawford. Ms. Crawford, a fitness professional, mother, and food advocate, formed the FSRC in order to educate the community on the dangers of genetically engineered food. “It’s a shame. Consumers have no idea they’re eating Frankenfoods contaminated by Monsanto’s GMOs. Consumers don’t know because our government is corrupt. FDA, USDA, Monsanto are one of the same. We want a Monsanto-free food supply. We want labels. We want what 50 other countries and 40% of the world‘s population has, which is the right to know, and the right to choose what we eat,” says Crawford.

    sean suddes occupy monsanto atlanta29 INCIDENT REPORT: Atlantas Food Supply Rescue Coalition Holds March Calling for End to Monsantos Genetically Engineered Food System Whole Foods Market USDA Steven Wing Publix Protest Proposition 37 Prop 37. Nina Roark McDonalds March Kroger Jaye Crawford Home Depot Georgia GCU GA Food Supply Rescue Coalition FDA Demonstration Atlanta ATL Agent Orange

    This “food fight” over genetically modified organisms has recently gained attention and the national spotlight. In November, Californians are poised to vote “yes” for the labeling of genetically engineered foods. Prop 37, a ballot initiative, would require food manufacturers to label products containing GMOs by 2013.

    sean suddes occupy monsanto atlanta7 INCIDENT REPORT: Atlantas Food Supply Rescue Coalition Holds March Calling for End to Monsantos Genetically Engineered Food System Whole Foods Market USDA Steven Wing Publix Protest Proposition 37 Prop 37. Nina Roark McDonalds March Kroger Jaye Crawford Home Depot Georgia GCU GA Food Supply Rescue Coalition FDA Demonstration Atlanta ATL Agent Orange

    “We already have food labels showing nutrition, allergy information and other facts consumers want to know. This measure simply adds information telling us if food is produced using genetic engineering, which is when food is modified in a laboratory by adding DNA from other plants, animals, bacteria or viruses”, says Nina Roark, a concerned grandmother form Atlanta. “We’re hoping that the seeds of change blow from California to put an end to this GMO food insanity.”

    With over $32 million in opposing donations to Prop 37, Roark reminds consumers, “Now more than ever, it’s crucial for consumers to choose manufacturer loyalties wisely. We have to vote hard with every food dollar we spend.”

    Early voting for Prop 37 begins on October 9. Voting at polling locations takes place on November 6, 2012.

    sean suddes occupy monsanto atlanta2 INCIDENT REPORT: Atlantas Food Supply Rescue Coalition Holds March Calling for End to Monsantos Genetically Engineered Food System Whole Foods Market USDA Steven Wing Publix Protest Proposition 37 Prop 37. Nina Roark McDonalds March Kroger Jaye Crawford Home Depot Georgia GCU GA Food Supply Rescue Coalition FDA Demonstration Atlanta ATL Agent Orange

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